© 2008-2019 by Mark Shutts Ministries.

"Is it wrong for Christians to go to the doctor? Our Preacher says that going to a doctor shows a lack of faith in God and even puts our salvation in jeopardy."

In 2009 Kent Schaible, the precious two-year-old son of Herbert and Catherine Schaible, contracted bacterial pneumonia. The little boy could very easily have been saved by doctors or (it was said) even just a few doses of Tylenol would have saved him but his parents chose not to allow it because they felt that going to a doctor or using any type of medicine demonstrated a complete lack of faith in God. The boy died.

 

There were many “medicines” in Jesus’ day and there are many verses that speak of using “medical treatments” such as applying bandages (Isaiah 1:6), oil (James 5:14), oil and wine (Luke 10:34), leaves (Ezekiel 47:12), wine (1 Timothy 5:23), and salves, particularly the “balm of Gilead” (Jeremiah 8:22). There is not a single instance anywhere in the entirety of Scripture where Christ condemns seeking physicians or using “earthly” remedies for healing and good health. In fact, as is amply evidenced by the preceding scriptures medical treatments are viewed quite favorably in the Bible. And don’t forget that Luke was a doctor and is called “Luke the beloved physician…” (Colossians 4:14

 

The fact that God can and sometimes does perform miracles of healing does not mean that we should reject the help of those individuals whom God Himself has endowed with the gift of medical knowledge and ability. More often than not God brings about healing by the hands of physicians and surgeons through whom He works to perform His healing miracles. There are many, many instances in the Bible when God performs His miracles through the hands of man. But the most important question that we must ask ourselves is this - "what about the 'good health state' of our soul? That is the more important question. Have you accepted Jesus into your heart as your personal Lord and Saviour? It’s the most important step you will ever take.

- Mark Shutts